fbpx

event

JBM Promotions & Memorial Hall OTR
Paul Thorn Band with Angela Perley
Sat May, 2 @ 8:00 PM (Doors: 7:00 pm )
Memorial Hall , 1225 Elm Street, Cincinnati, OH
All Ages
$40 - $25

Raised in Tupelo, Mississippi, among the same spirits (and some of the actual people) who nurtured the young Elvis generations before, Paul Thorn has rambled down back roads, battled four-time world champion boxer Roberto Duran on national television, signed with and been dropped by a major label, performed on stages with Bonnie Raitt, Mark Knopfler, Sting, and John Prine among many others, and made some of the most emotionally restless yet relatable music of our time. With 20 years of writing, touring, and entertaining under his belt, he shows no sign of slowing down with his new record, Don’t Let the Devil Ride, breaking genre barriers and topping charts, putting a new twist on his already-entertaining live show.

Paul Thorn Band

He’s also appeared on major television shows such as Late Night with Conan O’Brien and Jimmy Kimmel Live, been the subject of numerous National Public Radio (NPR) features and charted multiple times on the Billboard Top 100 and Americana Radio Charts. 

Paul Thorn has created an innovative and impressive career, pleasing crowds with his muscular brand of roots music – bluesy, rocking and thoroughly Southern American, yet also speaking universal truths.

Among those who value originality, inspiration, eccentricity and character – as well as talent that hovers somewhere on the outskirts of genius, the story of Paul Thorn is already familiar. Raised in Tupelo, Mississippi, among the same spirits (and some of the actual people) who nurtured the young Elvis generations before, Paul Thorn has rambled down back roads and jumped out of airplanes, worked for years in a furniture factory, battled four-time world champion boxer Roberto Duran on national television, signed with and been dropped by a major label, performed [on stages with Bonnie Raitt, Mark Knopfler, Sting, and John Prine among many others, and made some of the most emotionally restless yet fully accessible music of our time.

In 2018, Paul released an album titled Don’t Let the Devil Ride, which he describes as “the culmination of my whole life in music, coming back to my roots.” It marks his first time recording gospel music - featuring guests such as the Blind Boys of Alabama, the McCrary Sisters, and Preservation Hall Horns - and his creation of a body of strikingly original songs that address the foibles of human relationships without necessarily favoring the sacred over the profane.



 
Angela Perley

Angela Perley’s been writing tragic love songs rooted in folk, cosmic country and indie rock for over a decade now, and it all started with The Howlin’ Moons, an American rock band from Columbus, Ohio. Perley began making demos in college, dressing them up in brown paper bags (CD sleeves with personalized artwork and a decorative track list on the flip-side). Soon enough, Perley’s demos were heard by Fred Blitzer, CEO of Vital Companies, who arranged for Perley to meet and begin working with Columbus-based musicians Chris Connor and Billy Zehnal.

In quick succession, Angela Perley & The Howlin’ Moons found themselves performing at Nelsonville Music Festival alongside acts like The Flaming Lips, St. Vincent, Randy Newman, Merle Haggard and Gillian Welch. Since then Perley has opened for Willie Nelson, Lucinda Williams, Tyler Childers, O.A.R. and Blues Traveller and has shared bills with The Avett Brothers, Alison Krauss, Old Crow Medicine Show, Dawes and Colter Wall.

All of this has led up to Perley’s forthcoming LP, 4:30 (out Aug. 2), her first solo effort which she co-produced with longtime guitarist and collaborator, Chris Connor. During the final phase of production, she called on Michael Landolt (Maroon 5, O.A.R.) to mix the record and Dave Collins (D’Angelo, Bruce Springsteen) for mastering. Her third full-length record illustrates the songwriter’s knack for deft storytelling, warm vocal layers and disarming melodies that beget personal growth and mobility, surging from raw and far-sighted pathos. Robbie Crowell (Deer Tick, Diamond Rugs) contributes Hammond organ, Wurlitzer and Piano, adding crucial texture to the album, a la Al Kooper (Highway 61 / Blonde on Blonde era). Chris Connor’s guitar parts and song arrangements provide a lush and expansive soundtrack for Perley’s songs with touches of psychedelic delays and smoky tremolos to compliment her sonorous vocals.

Perley's character-driven love songs on 4:30 are surreal in their ability to master genre-fluidity, with forthright storytelling, wry lyricism and a host of dreamy instrumentation. Colorful acoustic and electric pianos, rich and elegant strings (i.e. “Don’t Look Back Mary”), breezy organ and punctual pedal steel (i.e. “Snake Charmer”), along with soft and sweet folk and pop melodies reminiscent of Patsy Cline and Jenny Lewis (i.e. “Local Heroes” & “4:30”) pervade the record. Perley is a self-taught guitarist, gravitating toward folk giants and personal heroes such as Bob Dylan and Neil Young.  “I taught myself a couple chords on guitar and then that was it. I was really into solo performances at first, and told myself, ‘Okay, I can do this,’” says Perley. Other early influences include Lucinda Williams, Patti Smith, and David Bowie.

Perley’s music is replete with realism and her methods of storytelling are deep and refreshing. This combination reveals an uncanny ability to finesse characters and poetry out of real life events, culling from important figures in her life with an effortless, stream-of-consciousness zeal. “Being realistic but also never giving up your sense of wonder about the world of art and music has been paramount to my growth as a songwriter,” says Perley.

4:30 a.m. also happens to be Perley's bedtime. “4:30 is when my body’s natural sleep cycle begins so if I’m not on a schedule I tend to stay up until then," says Perley. "My creative time begins as soon as the sun goes down. I'm definitely a night owl. I don't know what it is... but there's something special about it. It's dark outside, and it's quiet.”